WHAT SHOULD YOU DO TO DEAL WITH DISCRIMINATION AND OTHER HUMAN RIGHTS ISSUES?

(Adapted from Yukon Human Rights Commission website information.)

a)   Harassment

 If you think you have experienced sexual or another form of harassment, the following steps are recommended:

  • Keep a record of the incident(s) – time, date, description of actions that occurred, witnesses if any, etc.
  • If possible, let the harasser know how you feel, or that the behaviour is unwelcome.
  • Talk to someone whom you trust as soon as possible and if appropriate, ask the person to intervene on your behalf if you are not comfortable in handling it alone.
  • Check the policy in the workplace to see if there is a procedure for making a human rights or harassment complaint.
  • Report the incident to the person in charge – supervisor, manager,  owner, teacher, etc.
  • Talk to fellow employees, tenants, students in case the violator has harassed others.
  • Get help or advice from your union (if you are in a unionized workplace) or community support groups such as women’s centre or immigrant support services or the Human Rights Commission or appropriate human rights agency in your province or territory.
  • If the company or your employer or the person in authority fails to stop the harassment, or if the person in charge is the harasser, contact the Human Rights Commission for advice or to make a complaint.
  • Be aware that there are time limitations for the length of time you are allowed to make a complaint.  Check the policy in the organization or in the case of a human rights issue, your provincial or territorial human rights Commission or tribunal.
  • In an emergency or when you feel unsafe, phone the police.
  • Contact Japanese Canadian Associations in your area for other sources of local assistance or for assistance in Japanese.

b)   Discrimination

 If you think you have experienced discrimination, similar steps to a) above are recommended:

  • Keep a record of the incident(s) – time, date, description of actions that occurred, witnesses if any, etc.
  • If possible , let the person know how you feel, or that the behaviour is unwelcome.
  • Talk to someone whom you trust as soon as possible and if appropriate, ask the person to intervene on your behalf if you are not comfortable in handling it alone.
  • Check the policy in the workplace or organization to see if there is a procedure for making a complaint.
  • Report the incident to the person in charge – supervisor, manager,  owner, teacher, etc.
  • Talk to fellow employees, tenants, students in case the violator has treated others with discrimination
  • Get help or advice from your union (if you are in a unionized workplace) or community support groups such as women’s centre or immigrant support services or the Human Rights Commission or appropriate human rights agency in your province or territory.
  • If the company or your employer or the person in authority fails to do anything about the discrimination, or if the person in charge is the one accused of discriminating, contact the Human Rights Commission for advice or to make a complaint.
  • Be aware that there are time limitations for the length of time you are allowed to make a complaint.  Check the policy in the organization or in the case of a human rights issue, you provincial or territorial human rights Commission or tribunal.
  • In an emergency or when you feel unsafe phone the police.
  • Contact Japanese Canadian Associations in your area for other sources of local assistance or for assistance in Japanese.

c)   Reasonable Accommodation

If you think you need an accommodation due to a personal characteristic related to a disability, religious beliefs, or family status, consider the following steps:

  • Be aware of any policies or procedures on reasonable accommodation in your workplace or the organization or business, and follow them.
  • Let your employer or landlord or service provider know that you need help with an accommodation.
  • Make sure you provide them with the medical and other relevant information they need to find a good solution.  In the case of people with disabilities, enough information must be provided to show that there is a disability, and the limitations or restrictions of the disability, such as restrictions in movement due to an injury.
  • Cooperate with the employer by making suggestions about possible accommodation options and being willing to try them out. Failure to cooperate may lead to the employer turning down the request.
  • If the employer turns down the request because of “undue hardship”, ask for an explanation and providing more information if necessary. For more information on “undue hardship”, refer to detailed information on human rights commission websites.
  • Let the employer know if your needs change or if you no longer need to be accommodated.
  • Consult with your union if you are in a unionized workplace or the Human Rights Commission or Tribunal depending on your province or territory, if the employer, landlord or service provider refuses you reasonable accommodation.

National Association of Japanese Canadians, 180 McPhillips Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3E 2J9

Phone: (204) 943-2910 Fax: (888) 515-3192 Email: national@najc.ca

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